Get to know the careers Ahead

We want to put your education to work. Explore the job functions with our partners Albany Engineered Composites, BD Medical, Boeing, KIHOMAC, Merit Medical, Northrop Grumman, and Stadler.

Learn more about the careers options available to you after completing a training program in advanced manufacturing.
With a variety of employers and positions, you’ll find the right place to launch and enhance your career.

DISCOVER AVAILABLE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES BELOW.

There are two tracks within the rail technician program: electrical and mechanical. Depending on which track you choose, you could expect any number of important responsibilities. As an electrical rail technician, your daily tasks will include monitoring and analyzing electrical systems, collaborating with architects and engineers to determine the best placement of electrical wiring and to test devices for improvement, safety, and quality control. You will also be expected to update older electrical systems for changes, cost reductions, improvements, safety, and quality control all while repairing broken equipment and wiring. Most of all, you’ll be expected to understand the principles of electricity and electrical power circuits as well as the associated risks.

As a mechanical rail technician, you’ll work directly with builders to review architectural plans and make recommendations. You’ll also perform and analyze tests to track results and make improvements. You’ll be required to participate in test runs and meet all safety regulations and to modify systems to be environmentally friendly. Like an electrical rail technician, mechanical will also be responsible for performing calibrations for wire placement and electronic components, performing electrical qualification tests, and ensuring compliance with all outside parties involved. Moreover, you’ll also be expected to understand the principles of electricity and electrical power circuits as well as the associated risks.

Common Career Path at

Manufacturing Engineer Senior Production Planner Product Management Staff Recruiter Staff Trainer Engineer Engineering Technician Operations Associate Team Lead

A molding technician is responsible for all aspects of the injection molding process including set-up and tear down, troubleshooting, equipment maintenance, and workflow. Your day-to-day will include drafting and performing mold validations. You can also expect to work with production personnel and R&D to ensure molded components meet requirements, make necessary adjustments, oversee production while adhering to deadlines. You’ll also work with these teams during concept, prototyping, and release of new products. Of course, doing it all while managing raw molding materials in a way that prevents contamination all while maintaining a clean, safe work environment. As an injection molding technician, you’ll also work with outside vendors to develop tooling and fixtures that result in the manufacturing of high-quality products across all industries in a way that ensures traceability and reproducibility.

Common Career Path at

Manufacturing Engineer Senior Production Planner Product Management Product Management Staff Trainer Engineer Engineering Technician Operations Associate Team Lead
Manufacturing Engineer Senior Production Planner Product Management Staff Recruiter Staff Trainer Engineer Engineering Technician Operations Associate Team Lead

Machine operators  monitor the machinery during operation.

After a setter prepares a machine for production, an operator observes the machine and the products it makes. Operators may have to load the machine with materials for production or adjust the machine’s speeds during production. They must periodically inspect the parts a machine produces. If they detect a minor problem, operators may fix it themselves. If the repair is more serious, they may have an industrial machinery mechanic fix it.

Job duties generally vary with the size of the manufacturer and the type of machine being operated. Although some workers specialize in one or two types of machinery, many are trained to set up or operate a variety of machines. Machine operators are often able to control multiple machines at the same time because of increased automation.

Common Career Path at

Machine Operator Machinist Manager Senior Engineer Mechanic
Machine Operator Machinist Manager Senior Engineer Mechanic

A composite technician works with composite materials such as Kevlar, fiberglass, and other carbon materials, to create parts. You might work in production with responsibilities like fabricating parts in composite materials or you may use your knowledge of manufacturing and engineering to fix anything from a skateboard to an aircraft. Other duties are lifting heavy objects and operating machinery. As a composite technician, you will use different skills including oven processes and vacuum techniques and maintain and repair composite components. You are responsible for understanding technical plans and blueprints, and you work using precision tools.

Common Career Path at

Machine Operator Manufacturing Engineer Quality Engineer Manager Composite Molding Specialist Director of Improvement
Systems Engineer Inventory Management Analyst Aircraft Technician Analyst Training Specialist Production Engineer Mechanic Team Lead Logistics Specialist Senior Technician
Machine Operator Manufacturing Engineer Quality Engineer Manager Composite Molding Specialist Director of Improvement
Machine Operator Manufacturing Engineer Quality Engineer Manager Composite Molding Specialist Director of Improvement
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